Pear-Beet Fruit Leather

Details

Posted
4 Comments

I’ve been obsessed with fruit leather since I was a little kid. The dehydrated goodness was not only seriously tasty, but I loved how I could take it on any adventure and how fun it was to peel and eat. Not much has changed since I’ve gotten older, except now instead of relying on the small selections of store-bought flavors, I create my own–based on seasonal ingredients and where I (or a friend) am going.

If you ask me, fruit leather is the perfect accompaniment on any trip. It is so easy to transport and such a nice reminder of home. I love to make a batch for my favorite people before they leave on any getaway, big or small. The latter might be as simple as a little one on their way to school, while the former can be an overseas escape. It doesn’t quite matter where, just as long as there are people I love who love to travel, I will continue to experiment with different flavors and dehydrate with joy.

MORE: No time to cook? This Kate Bakes Bar Collection is also the ideal way to say “happy travels.” See more now

pearbeetfruitleatherwrapped

At first, pear and beet may seem like an odd combination, but they actually play off of each other perfectly. The beet provides a gorgeous crimson color, as well as an earthier, almost heartier flavor, while the pear gives it a sweet finish. Add in a little honey, depending on the pear’s flavor, and a dash or two of cinnamon (because, hello, fall!) and you have the ultimate treat for traveling friends, school-aged kids, hungry co-workers, or, yes, even you.

You don’t need a dehydrator to create fruit leather, though it is a handy tool if you plan on doing it often as it frees up your oven. The recipe itself couldn’t be easier, and really allows for a lot of experimentation. Simply take your favorite fruits, blend, pour, smooth, heat, and wait. That’s really about all it takes to make your very own snack. One note is to always use the freshest fruit possible, and taste from whole fruit all the way to the oven to adjust the amount of sugar or spices. And remember, the fruit leather tends to get a bit sweeter as it dries, so be cautious not to make it too sweet before dehydrating.

MORE: Another travel-friendly snack is these Sesame Bars with Thyme. Make them now

pearbeetfruitleather3

Pear-Beet Fruit Leather

Makes: 16 to 18 fruit leathers

Prep Time: 20 Minutes

Cook Time: 8 Hours

Total Time: 9 Hours 20 Minutes

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups ripe Bartlett pears, peeled and chopped
  • 1 cup red beets, steamed and chopped
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons honey, such as clover, plus more as needed
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)

Directions:

  1. Spray either 2 parchment-lined 9-x-13-inch baking sheets or the round inserts for a dehydrator with cooking spray. Preheat the oven to 170F.
  2. Blend the pear, beets, honey, and cinnamon, if using, in a blender until a smooth paste is formed and no fruit chunks remain. Taste and adjust sugar and seasoning as necessary.
  3. Spread the mixture onto the baking sheets in a thin even layer.
  4. Bake for 9 hours, or until the mixture is no longer sticky and holds together when pulled at the edges. Remove and let cool completely before packaging.

Materials

  • Parchment paper, preferably craft
  • Tape, such as Washi

Directions

  1. Cut the parchment paper horizontally into 2-inch strips. Peel the fruit leather from its parchment and slice the fruit leather horizontally into 11/2-inch strips.
  2. Place a strip of fruit leather on the pre-cut parchment and roll up tightly.
  3. Fasten the edge with a piece of tape. (If using Washi, cut a longer piece to go all the way around the roll so that it stays in place perfectly.)
Photo taken by Heidi Murphy/White Loft Studio

Eat Boutique was an award-winning shop and story-driven recipe site created by Maggie Battista – an author, business guide and alignment seeker. After hosting retail markets for 25,000+ guests, Maggie now supports entrepreneurs as they create values-based businesses through We Are Magic StudioFollow Maggie Battista on Instagram.

Comments