Dreamy Oatmeal Cookies and a Giveaway for Jessica Fechtor’s Debut Novel, Stir

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I consider it my life’s mission to find an oatmeal cookie to love, the kind of cookie that makes all the other cookies not matter so much.

Oats, those nutrient-dense little suckers, make cookies seem almost healthy. I toss oats into smoothies and eat bowlfuls scattered with fresh fruit, so why can’t a proper oatmeal cookie stand-in for breakfast, too? They can, if they’re done right.

My desert-island oatmeal cookie would be big and round – no bite-sized versions, please. It would be rich in texture, loaded with grains, chewy, and a little bit sweet. It would taste too good to be good for you, even though it is. And no raisins or chocolate chips for this oatmeal-cookie lover. Raisins just get in the way of the oats, and chocolate chips always seem to make any cookie a chocolate chip cookie, which sort of takes away from the oatmeal cookie thing.

MORE: Breakfast is also delicious with these Cranberry Crumb Muffins.

Stir Oatmeal Cookies 1 // eatboutique.com

Jessica Fechtor’s oatmeal cookie, named after her husband, Eli, comes pretty close to fitting the bill. These cookies make me swoon. In fact, they did the same for everyone at Eat Boutique headquarters. First, they’re huge. So huge, they made me wonder if I had scooped up the dough incorrectly. Nope, two big scoops was right, thank goodness for that.

Eli’s Oatmeal Cookies are sweet but in the sort of way that makes you want to saddle them up beside a cup of milky black tea or espresso. They’re the just-sweet-enough compliment. And I imagine that an oatmeal cookie like this would turn any breakfast into a party, because they did here! I slid them into small bags and handed them out to colleagues and friends who popped by the morning I made them. I had to share a good thing.

In case you don’t know, Jessica lost her sense of smell and the sight in her left eye when an aneurysm burst in her brain. Her recovery began in the kitchen the moment she could stand at the stove again. In her hard-to-put-down debut novel Stir: My Broken Brain and the Meals That Brought Me Home, Jessica shares everything, including 27 of the recipes that helped her find her way.

MORE: Need a clever way to gift cookies and more? Check out a few of our favorite Gift Bags.

Stir Oatmeal Cookies 2 // eatboutique.com

I met Jessica when she still lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts; she’s since moved to the west coast. At the time, I knew her as the writer behind Sweet Amandine, a favorite local blog. After every one of our meet-ups, I remembered her as totally inquisitive, eager to know you, and kind (pure kindness). Reading Stir was like getting further acquainted with a long lost pal who moved away too soon.

This novel is better than any book you’ll read this summer. It’s an engrossing, uplifting love story full of recipes worth sharing with someone (everyone!) who needs them. I know a handful of friends who need Eli’s Oatmeal Cookies right now, so I’m off to make them again.

You should make them, too, but only after you enter this giveaway.

***GIVEAWAY*** Win your very own copy of Stir: My Broken Brain and the Meals That Brought Me Home 

UPDATE: This giveaway is closed and the winner has been notified. Thanks for sharing your favorite cookies!

It’s so easy to enter. Just comment below and tell us what your comfort cookie is and why! Every follow on Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, and Instagram earns another entry too — just follow us there and leave a comment here with the link(s) to your social media profile.

We’ll randomly pick a winner on Thursday, August 13, 2015. If your name is picked, we’ll notify you between August 13-15. Please reply within 48 hours, or we’ll need to choose another winner. (Don’t forget the fine print: We can only ship to continental U.S. addresses.)

MORE: Want more recipes for gift-able baked goodies? Pre-order Food Gift Love: More Than 100 Recipes to Make, Wrap & Share now.

Stir Oatmeal Cookies 3 // eatboutique.com

Eli's Oatmeal Cookies

Eli doesn’t like sweets—nobody’s perfect—but he does have a soft spot for a few select things, oatmeal cookies being one of them. These are his favorite. They’re big, chewy saucers, crisp around the edges, with just enough whole wheat flour to warm up the flavor. To scoop the dough for these, I use a 1 1/2-tablespoon cookie scoop, piling two level scoops, one on top of the other. -Jessica Fechtor

*Recipe reprinted from Stir by arrangement with Avery Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright © 2015, Jessica Fechtor.

Makes: 16 cookies

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups (135 grams) rolled oats (not instant)
  • 1 cup (125 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup (57 grams) whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup (2 sticks; 226 grams) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup (100 grams) dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon fine-grain salt
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions:

  1. Mix the first six ingredients (the oats through the cinnamon) in a medium bowl. Combine the melted butter, the sugars, and salt in a large bowl and whisk well. Then add the egg and vanilla and whisk until smooth.
  2. Add the dry ingredients to the butter mixture and stir with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon until just combined. Do not overmix. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for 20 to 30 minutes, until the dough is cool and firm but still scoopable.
  3. While the dough is resting, heat the oven to 325°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Using 3 level tablespoons per cookie, scoop the dough onto the prepared baking sheet. The cookies will spread as they bake, so leave 2 to 3 inches between each mound of dough. I fit 8 cookies, staggered, per pan.
  4. Bake for 18 to 22 minutes until golden brown. Slide the parchment paper with the cookies onto a rack and cool completely. Repeat with the remaining dough, making sure to begin with a room temperature baking sheet.
Photos by Heidi/White Loft Studio.

Eat Boutique is an award-winning shop and story-driven recipe site created by Maggie Battista – an author, business guide and alignment seeker. After hosting pop-up markets for 25,000+ guests, Maggie is now supporting entrepreneurs as they create values-based businesses in service, food, & retail through Eat Boutique StudioFollow Maggie Battista on Instagram.

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